Some FAQs

Bullying affects us all. Its victims range from seniors to adults to teens to children and even toddlers. Bullying is a behavior that is usually formed at a young age. As time passes, this behavior often progresses and becomes harder to stop. Both the bully and the bullied have issues that, if not addressed, have a strong link to suicide by both parties.

The definition of bullying varies from country to country, even continent to continent. However, it is always similar - but most categories of bullying have been redefined over time, and reclassified.

"Bullying is typically a form of repeated, persistent, and aggressive behaviour directed at an individual or individuals that is intended to cause (or should be known to cause) fear and distress and/or harm to another person's body, feelings, self-esteem, or reputation. Bullying occurs in a context where there is a real or perceived power imbalance.... Bullying is a dynamic of unhealthy interaction that can take many forms. It can be physical (e.g., hitting, pushing, tripping), verbal (e.g., name calling, mocking, or making sexist, racist, or homophobic comments), or social (e.g., excluding others from a group, spreading gossip or rumours)."

Government of Ontario (Canada) - policy #144 (2009)

Here are some facts we've collected from various sources - some are old, some are new - but one thing remains consistent, bullying has always been around and it is getting worse.

 


 

Forms of Bullying

intimidation • sarcasm • threats • negativety • insults • humiliation • sexual comments • spreading rumours • ignoring & excluding • laughing at someone • physical harm • aggression & attitude • stealing • property destruction • unwanted touching • cyberbullying

 

Common Reasons for Bullying

physical appearance • race/ethnicity • gender • disability • religion • sexual orientation

 

Effects of Bullying

mental health issues • behavior problems • sleep difficulties • fear • anxiety • nausea • high blood pressure • cardiovascular issues • depression • disconnect • headaches • stomachaches • low self esteem • trauma • panick attacks • self blame • loneliness • isolation • trust issues • suicide

 

Bullying & Youths

1 in 3 youths have been bullied

70.6% of young people say they have seen bullying in their schools

School-based bullying prevention programs decrease bullying by up to 25%

Bullies and their victims are at high risk of suicide

When bystanders intervene, bullying stops within 10 seconds 57% of the time

Approximately 30% of young people admit to bullying others

9 out of 10 LGBT students experienced harassment at school

80% of the time, an argument with a bully will end up in a physical fight.

85% of bullying takes place in front of other people

 

Bullying & Adults

31% of adults have experienced bullying

71% of bullied adults suffer from stress

70% of bullied adults experience anxiety/depression

55% of bullied adults report a loss of confidence

39% of bullied adults suffer from sleep loss, 26% have headaches and 22% experience muscle tension or pain

19% of bullied adults reported a mental breakdown

17% of bullied adults noted an inability to function day-to-day, i.e. calling in sick frequently

 


 

Kids Helplines

1-800-668-6868 Kids Help Line Canada

1-800-273-8255 Crisis Hotline USA

More to come!

 


 

Sources

These are stats based off of surveys across North America conducted in differen years. Most of the more recent data showed an increase in bullying. Keep in mind some areas are worse than others and a lot of areas don't yet have available statistics or inaccurate ones. There are also far more detailed statistics if you search for them. We'll try to keep this page up to date as we come across more information.

www.cdc.gov/ViolencePrevention/youthviolence/index.html

www.bullyingstatistics.org/content/cyber-bullying-statistics.html

www.Olweus.org

www.stopbullyingnow.hrsa.gov/

youthviolence.edschool.virginia.edu/violence-in-schools/national-statistics.html

www.mentalhealthcommission.ca

www.cihr-irsc.gc.ca/e/45822.html

www.prevnet.ca

www.pacer.org

Hawkins, D. L., Pepler, D., and Craig, W. M. (2001). Peer interventions in playground bullying. Social Development, 10, 512-527.

Bradshaw, C.P., Sawyer, A.L., & O'Brennan, L.M. (2007). Bullying and peer victimization at school: Perceptual differences between students and school staff. School Psychology Review, 36 (3), 361-382.

Holt et al, 2015, Suicide Prevention Resource Center, n.d

Gini & Pozzoli, 2013

Center for Disease Control, 2017

McCallion & Feder, 2013

National Center for Educational Statistics, 2016

Craig & Pepler, 1997

 

Some FAQs

Bullying affects us all. Its victims range from seniors to adults to teens to children and even toddlers. Bullying is a behavior that is usually formed at a young age. As time passes, this behavior often progresses and becomes harder to stop. Both the bully and the bullied have issues that, if not addressed, have a strong link to suicide by both parties.

The definition of bullying varies from country to country, even continent to continent. However, it is always similar - but most categories of bullying have been redefined over time, and reclassified.

"Bullying is typically a form of repeated, persistent, and aggressive behaviour directed at an individual or individuals that is intended to cause (or should be known to cause) fear and distress and/or harm to another person's body, feelings, self-esteem, or reputation. Bullying occurs in a context where there is a real or perceived power imbalance.... Bullying is a dynamic of unhealthy interaction that can take many forms. It can be physical (e.g., hitting, pushing, tripping), verbal (e.g., name calling, mocking, or making sexist, racist, or homophobic comments), or social (e.g., excluding others from a group, spreading gossip or rumours)."

Government of Ontario (Canada) - policy #144 (2009)

Here are some facts we've collected from various sources - some are old, some are new - but one thing remains consistent, bullying has always been around and it is getting worse.

 


 

Forms of Bullying

intimidation • sarcasm • threats • negativety • insults • humiliation • sexual comments • spreading rumours • ignoring & excluding • laughing at someone • physical harm • aggression & attitude • stealing • property destruction • unwanted touching • cyberbullying

 

Common Reasons for Bullying

physical appearance • race/ethnicity • gender • disability • religion • sexual orientation

 

Effects of Bullying

mental health issues • behavior problems • sleep difficulties • fear • anxiety • nausea • high blood pressure • cardiovascular issues • depression • disconnect • headaches • stomachaches • low self esteem • trauma • panick attacks • self blame • loneliness • isolation • trust issues • suicide

 

Bullying & Youths

1 in 3 youths have been bullied

70.6% of young people say they have seen bullying in their schools

School-based bullying prevention programs decrease bullying by up to 25%

Bullies and their victims are at high risk of suicide

When bystanders intervene, bullying stops within 10 seconds 57% of the time

Approximately 30% of young people admit to bullying others

9 out of 10 LGBT students experienced harassment at school

80% of the time, an argument with a bully will end up in a physical fight.

85% of bullying takes place in front of other people

 

Bullying & Adults

31% of adults have experienced bullying

71% of bullied adults suffer from stress

70% of bullied adults experience anxiety/depression

55% of bullied adults report a loss of confidence

39% of bullied adults suffer from sleep loss, 26% have headaches and 22% experience muscle tension or pain

19% of bullied adults reported a mental breakdown

17% of bullied adults noted an inability to function day-to-day, i.e. calling in sick frequently

 


 

Kids Helplines

1-800-668-6868 Kids Help Line Canada

1-800-273-8255 Crisis Hotline USA

More to come!

 


 

Sources

These are stats based off of surveys across North America conducted in differen years. Most of the more recent data showed an increase in bullying. Keep in mind some areas are worse than others and a lot of areas don't yet have available statistics or inaccurate ones. There are also far more detailed statistics if you search for them. We'll try to keep this page up to date as we come across more information.

www.cdc.gov/ViolencePrevention/youthviolence/index.html

www.bullyingstatistics.org/content/cyber-bullying-statistics.html

www.Olweus.org

www.stopbullyingnow.hrsa.gov/

youthviolence.edschool.virginia.edu/violence-in-schools/national-statistics.html

www.mentalhealthcommission.ca

www.cihr-irsc.gc.ca/e/45822.html

www.prevnet.ca

www.pacer.org

Hawkins, D. L., Pepler, D., and Craig, W. M. (2001). Peer interventions in playground bullying. Social Development, 10, 512-527.

Bradshaw, C.P., Sawyer, A.L., & O'Brennan, L.M. (2007). Bullying and peer victimization at school: Perceptual differences between students and school staff. School Psychology Review, 36 (3), 361-382.

Holt et al, 2015, Suicide Prevention Resource Center, n.d

Gini & Pozzoli, 2013

Center for Disease Control, 2017

McCallion & Feder, 2013

National Center for Educational Statistics, 2016

Craig & Pepler, 1997

Some FAQs

Bullying affects us all. Its victims range from seniors to adults to teens to children and even toddlers. Bullying is a behavior that is usually formed at a young age. As time passes, this behavior often progresses and becomes harder to stop. Both the bully and the bullied have issues that, if not addressed, have a strong link to suicide by both parties.

The definition of bullying varies from country to country, even continent to continent. However, it is always similar - but most categories of bullying have been redefined over time, and reclassified.

"Bullying is typically a form of repeated, persistent, and aggressive behaviour directed at an individual or individuals that is intended to cause (or should be known to cause) fear and distress and/or harm to another person's body, feelings, self-esteem, or reputation. Bullying occurs in a context where there is a real or perceived power imbalance.... Bullying is a dynamic of unhealthy interaction that can take many forms. It can be physical (e.g., hitting, pushing, tripping), verbal (e.g., name calling, mocking, or making sexist, racist, or homophobic comments), or social (e.g., excluding others from a group, spreading gossip or rumours)."

Government of Ontario (Canada) - policy #144 (2009)

Here are some facts we've collected from various sources - some are old, some are new - but one thing remains consistent, bullying has always been around and it is getting worse.

 


 

Forms of Bullying

intimidation • sarcasm • threats • negativety • insults • humiliation • sexual comments • spreading rumours • ignoring & excluding • laughing at someone • physical harm • aggression & attitude • stealing • property destruction • unwanted touching • cyberbullying

 

Common Reasons for Bullying

physical appearance • race/ethnicity • gender • disability • religion • sexual orientation

 

Effects of Bullying

mental health issues • behavior problems • sleep difficulties • fear • anxiety • nausea • high blood pressure • cardiovascular issues • depression • disconnect • headaches • stomachaches • low self esteem • trauma • panick attacks • self blame • loneliness • isolation • trust issues • suicide

 

Bullying & Youths

1 in 3 youths have been bullied

70.6% of young people say they have seen bullying in their schools

School-based bullying prevention programs decrease bullying by up to 25%

Bullies and their victims are at high risk of suicide

When bystanders intervene, bullying stops within 10 seconds 57% of the time

Approximately 30% of young people admit to bullying others

9 out of 10 LGBT students experienced harassment at school

80% of the time, an argument with a bully will end up in a physical fight.

85% of bullying takes place in front of other people

 

Bullying & Adults

31% of adults have experienced bullying

71% of bullied adults suffer from stress

70% of bullied adults experience anxiety/depression

55% of bullied adults report a loss of confidence

39% of bullied adults suffer from sleep loss, 26% have headaches and 22% experience muscle tension or pain

19% of bullied adults reported a mental breakdown

17% of bullied adults noted an inability to function day-to-day, i.e. calling in sick frequently

 


 

Kids Helplines

1-800-668-6868 Kids Help Line Canada

1-800-273-8255 Crisis Hotline USA

More to come!

 


 

Sources

These are stats based off of surveys across North America conducted in differen years. Most of the more recent data showed an increase in bullying. Keep in mind some areas are worse than others and a lot of areas don't yet have available statistics or inaccurate ones. There are also far more detailed statistics if you search for them. We'll try to keep this page up to date as we come across more information.

www.cdc.gov/ViolencePrevention

www.bullyingstatistics.org/content

www.Olweus.org

www.stopbullyingnow.hrsa.gov/

youthviolence.edschool.virginia.edu

www.mentalhealthcommission.ca

www.cihr-irsc.gc.ca/e/45822.html

www.prevnet.ca

www.pacer.org

Hawkins, D. L., Pepler, D., and Craig, W. M. (2001). Peer interventions in playground bullying. Social Development, 10, 512-527.

Bradshaw, C.P., Sawyer, A.L., & O'Brennan, L.M. (2007). Bullying and peer victimization at school: Perceptual differences between students and school staff. School Psychology Review, 36 (3), 361-382.

Holt et al, 2015, Suicide Prevention Resource Center, n.d

Gini & Pozzoli, 2013

Center for Disease Control, 2017

McCallion & Feder, 2013

National Center for Educational Statistics, 2016

Craig & Pepler, 1997